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ozzman
(@ozzman)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  
Posted by: @trouble
Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel...

Get the hint? It will remove that swelling and tenderness *very quickly*.

Promise.

I'm ...not....sure ... what are you trying to tell me LOL

Thanks, I haden't even thought of trying arnica or arnica based compounds, it has always worked wonders for bruises on those rare occasions that I bruise...will give Traumeel a try.

Apparently this will be the most unscientific recovery...cissus, ART, homeopathy....but best of all no cortisone shots...


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pat
 pat
(@pat)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 6
 

what exactly is the issue with your shoulder? AC joint seperations don't just happen. You need to have been struck by something for the most part.

It sounds like what you are describing is an overuse injury, like tendonitis or some sort of inflamation within the joint.

Have you seen a specialist yet?

where does it hurt?

Stop pressing, stop doing any pulling movements overhead, and let the inflamation go down first....ice, rest, bio-freeze, anti inflam, etc....Once inflamation is down, you can begin a corrective exercise program. If you don't let the inflamation go away, you end up just digging yourself deeper.


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trouble
(@trouble)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 31
 

Heh. Took you long enough to show up, boyo. Ozzie needs to know which movements to avoid, specifically.


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ozzman
(@ozzman)
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Joined: 5 months ago
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Topic starter  
Posted by: @pat
what exactly is the issue with your shoulder? AC joint seperations don't just happen. You need to have been struck by something for the most part.

It sounds like what you are describing is an overuse injury, like tendonitis or some sort of inflamation within the joint.

Have you seen a specialist yet?

where does it hurt?

Stop pressing, stop doing any pulling movements overhead, and let the inflamation go down first....ice, rest, bio-freeze, anti inflam, etc....Once inflamation is down, you can begin a corrective exercise program. If you don't let the inflamation go away, you end up just digging yourself deeper.

I will see the ART specialist tonight. So no workout for me tonight. However I do have questions about the type of exercises. As I described above, the pain site is between right in the ridge that forms between the two heads (front, and medial) of the delts. I can feel two bones on either side of this joint. This pain gets aggravated when I do any pushing exercise.

I understand that I will have to wait until the pain completely goes away, but in the mean time just doing cardio and leg raises doesn't sound appealing for the next month or so. I would like to know what else can I do using first and foremost the rule of thumb for pain, if it hurts, don't do it...

So for instanace, I would imagine that front squats are out, but how about back squats? Or any variation thereof.

How about rowing exercises, deadlifting? , tricep extensions, as long as they're not overhead. How about curls? I guess no standing calf raises, but seated are ok.

Any suggestions?


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D Sade
(@d-sade)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 3
 

Hey, Pat...good to see you.

I had a good time hanging out with you in Vegas. You would be a great asset to any kind of venture...let's talk some more.


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pat
 pat
(@pat)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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Matt- It was nice to meet you as well. We shall do it again sometime.

Trouble- yes, I was in vegas at the olympia.

Ozzman

QUOTEI will see the ART specialist tonight. So no workout for me tonight. However I do have questions about the type of exercises. As I described above, the pain site is between right in the ridge that forms between the two heads (front, and medial) of the delts. I can feel two bones on either side of this joint. This pain gets aggravated when I do any pushing exercise.

I understand that I will have to wait until the pain completely goes away, but in the mean time just doing cardio and leg raises doesn't sound appealing for the next month or so. I would like to know what else can I do using first and foremost the rule of thumb for pain, if it hurts, don't do it...

So for instanace, I would imagine that front squats are out, but how about back squats? Or any variation thereof.

How about rowing exercises, deadlifting? , tricep extensions, as long as they're not overhead. How about curls? I guess no standing calf raises, but seated are ok.

Any suggestions?

An ART specialist is great. I would still go to an orthopedist to have him check you for an AC joint separation.

There are three grades of separation:

1- tender to the touch/hurts to go overhead
2- there will be a slight raise in your collar bone
3- your collar bone is going to stick all the way up and you can press on it and it will move up and down

But, like I said, if you separated your AC joint you should be able to pin it to an event.....like "I was walking down the street and some fat bitch kicked me and I fell over and hit my shoulder really hard".....see what I mean?

I would still go get it looked at by a specialist if I were you.

In the meantime,

No overhead pressing. If it is an AC joint, overhead is going to hurt pretty bad. If it isn't an AC joint, and it is inflamation (like I am guessing), overhead is going to bother it anyway as things get pressed up into the subacromial space.

Front squatting will hurt. Back squatting will hurt too because you have your shoulders externally rotated and abducted to hold the bar back there. This can place some pressure on the joint, especially if it is some inflamation.

You should stick to low rows, like seated cable rows, one arm DB rows, prone incline DB rows....things that aren't ballistic (like most people do BB bent over rows). Slow controlled reps. You can train legs....lunges, step ups, if you have a trap bar you might be able to get away with deadlifting in that, let presses, etc....

You need to go to the doctor though and find out what the actual problem is before trying to fix it. Otherwise it is a guessing game and I am just throwing things out there.

If it is inflamation, just don't do things that agravate it, let the inflamation do down and then we can talk about improving the integrity of your scapular stabilizers.

If it is an AC joint problem, doing things that don't bother it (ie no oeverhead) is the way to go.


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ozzman
(@ozzman)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  
Posted by: @pat

An ART specialist is great. I would still go to an orthopedist to have him check you for an AC joint separation.

There are three grades of separation:

1- tender to the touch/hurts to go overhead
2- there will be a slight raise in your collar bone
3- your collar bone is going to stick all the way up and you can press on it and it will move up and down

But, like I said, if you separated your AC joint you should be able to pin it to an event.....like "I was walking down the street and some fat bitch kicked me and I fell over and hit my shoulder really hard".....see what I mean?

I would still go get it looked at by a specialist if I were you.

My case is #1, I had heard that same description from a physical therapist already. Except his answer was that there is really nothing to do for it.

As far as the specialist, I will keep that option open, I have the appointment with a Chiro that has ART training, as this ids both an evaluation and treatment I would like to give it a good try. The website states:

QUOTEWhat is an ART treatment like?

Every ART session is actually a combination of examination and treatment. The ART provider uses his or her hands to evaluate the texture, tightness and movement of muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments and nerves. Abnormal tissues are treated by combining precisely directed tension with very specific patient movements.

These treatment protocols - over 500 specific moves - are unique to ART. They allow providers to identify and correct the specific problems that are affecting each individual patient. ART is not a cookie-cutter approach.

In the case of the Ortho, it is slightly more difficult as it would take months. The usual song and dance with the insurance co, etc

I appreciate all of your help, and will keep those exercise recommendations in mind.

thanks.


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pat
 pat
(@pat)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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Posted by: @ozzman
My case is #1, I had heard that same description from a physical therapist already. Except his answer was that there is really nothing to do for it.

As far as the specialist, I will keep that option open, I have the appointment with a Chiro that has ART training, as this ids both an evaluation and treatment I would like to give it a good try. The website states:
In the case of the Ortho, it is slightly more difficult as it would take months. The usual song and dance with the insurance co, etc
I appreciate all of your help, and will keep those exercise recommendations in mind.

thanks.

So a therapist diagnosed you?

anyway, the only thing you can do if you have a grade 1 separation is to keep your arms from going overhead for awhile and you even might want to limit your bench press ROM....put a few towls or a half foam roller on your chest and bench in a short ROM, to keep your shoulders from going back to far and giving you some pain.

rest, ice, and give it a number of weeks and then slowly integrate back in the movements that you enjoy, using pain as a guide....ie, if it hurts don't do it, and use a pain free ROM, etc....


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FunkMasterFlex
(@funkmasterflex)
New Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 4
 

im going to an ART/CHiro tommorow to get looked at for an impingement/rotator issue. Ill let you know how it works out for me. I had injured myself power lifting improperly back in college and 5 yrs later its catching up to me.


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ozzman
(@ozzman)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  

To sum it up in one word; OUCH!

But let's start from the beginning, well not really the beginning where I turn in the wrong entrance walked in a building that smelled like fresh paint/joint compund, had no signs for the tenants offices, but I went upstairs anyway, used the bathroom (long ride) looked around, and then realized it was an office building under construction...so I went next dorr to the right office building....

The palce where I went is a Chiropractic practice that specializes in sports injuries and treatment. They use traditional chiropractic techniques but mainly use ART for their treatments. As the treatment progresses, the doctor said we will incorporate some Pilates exercises as well as balance coordination, stretching, using teh foam rolloer, balance balls, etc.

After a thourough conversation about the nature of my pain, training history, etc, he proceeded to check my range of motion and pain sensitivity to certain stretches. He agreed that my left A/C joint was inflamed and slightly raised.

Here is where the fun began. ART is like deep tissue manipulation while stretching. He worked my traps first, really tight..I won't even mention each muscle by name, but if it is near the shoulder, he did (except for the bicep, that's Friday) the most painful one, deep in the armpit. Another interesting one, related to range of motion, the lat and the muscle right above that, where sort of stuck together, before treatment.

Today I'm sore, very sore. The joint feels sore still, but the muscles are loose. It's a good thing that this week I have lots of extra things to do, it would have been hard to go to the gym anyway, so I will let my body fully rest, keep it fed, but resting.

I would recommend ART treatment to everyone that has a nagging tightness in a muscle area, or even if it a joint that is bothering you, it is worth it. If you don't, try to include foam rollers for your warmups, your lifting life will be extended and therefore your gains as well.

o


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Max32
(@max32)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 3
 
Posted by: @trouble
Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel. Traumeel...

Get the hint? It will remove that swelling and tenderness *very quickly*.

Promise.

so you're a fan....
Please go a little deeper on this one Trouble. I am unfamiliar with this. Wondering if it would help my girls knees out.

I would also rec' celadrin over glucosamine personally.

Lastly, I cannot recommend ART enough! That saved my ass with my old AC joint injury years ago...


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pat
 pat
(@pat)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 6
 
Posted by: @ozzman
To sum it up in one word; OUCH!

But let's start from the beginning, well not really the beginning where I turn in the wrong entrance walked in a building that smelled like fresh paint/joint compund, had no signs for the tenants offices, but I went upstairs anyway, used the bathroom (long ride) looked around, and then realized it was an office building under construction...so I went next dorr to the right office building....
The palce where I went is a Chiropractic practice that specializes in sports injuries and treatment. They use traditional chiropractic techniques but mainly use ART for their treatments. As the treatment progresses, the doctor said we will incorporate some Pilates exercises as well as balance coordination, stretching, using teh foam rolloer, balance balls, etc.

After a thourough conversation about the nature of my pain, training history, etc, he proceeded to check my range of motion and pain sensitivity to certain stretches. He agreed that my left A/C joint was inflamed and slightly raised.

Here is where the fun began. ART is like deep tissue manipulation while stretching. He worked my traps first, really tight..I won't even mention each muscle by name, but if it is near the shoulder, he did (except for the bicep, that's Friday) the most painful one, deep in the armpit. Another interesting one, related to range of motion, the lat and the muscle right above that, where sort of stuck together, before treatment.

Today I'm sore, very sore. The joint feels sore still, but the muscles are loose. It's a good thing that this week I have lots of extra things to do, it would have been hard to go to the gym anyway, so I will let my body fully rest, keep it fed, but resting.

I would recommend ART treatment to everyone that has a nagging tightness in a muscle area, or even if it a joint that is bothering you, it is worth it. If you don't, try to include foam rollers for your warmups, your lifting life will be extended and therefore your gains as well.

o

Good stuff. It sounds like the physical therapist you went to had the correct assumption. You have a grade 1-2 AC separation.

Now, just because the ART made you feel better, don't go jumping back into training. give yourself time to heal. check out the training recomendations I have up there as far as low rows, etc.....and stick with that for a number of weeks and give it time.


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ozzman
(@ozzman)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 19
Topic starter  
Posted by: @pat
Good stuff. It sounds like the physical therapist you went to had the correct assumption. You have a grade 1-2 AC separation.

Now, just because the ART made you feel better, don't go jumping back into training. give yourself time to heal. check out the training recomendations I have up there as far as low rows, etc.....and stick with that for a number of weeks and give it time.

<saluting an officer, hand to forehead> Yes Sir!

Yeah that was the plan, I know I have to take it easy, light or no work for a while won't kill me (or hurt me) jumping right back will. Wightlifting and general conditioning are long term commitments, for long term results.


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trouble
(@trouble)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 31
 

Ozzie: smart-ass! Your ART therapist should give you instructions on recovery / cautionaries. As Patrick wisely counsels, easy does it.

Max: Celedrin is meant to work synergistically with glucosamine. Its not a matter of preference; they may well work better taken together, rather than separately. Unfortunately, "innovative, targeted & proprietary cetylated fatty acid esters & other active synergists" is a vague product description.

Try the Traumeel. It permanently cured chronic inflammation in my knee - a very long-standing injury. I've had clients use it on other chronic injuries (hamstrings, elbow/forearm tendonistis) with excellent results. It's extremely popular in Europe (from where it originates). I heard about quite a while ago, bought it for myself and an elderly neighbor (with arthritis), used it, forgot about it, then found my old tube to let a local client try it (with recurrent patellar/tendonitis), who found it to work quite well. I've since been recommending it on forums. Amazon carries it from a variety of retail sources, and its possible to find it there at a good price.


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Max32
(@max32)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 3
 
Posted by: @trouble
Ozzie: smart-ass! Your ART therapist should give you instructions on recovery / cautionaries. As Patrick wisely counsels, easy does it.

Max: Celedrin is meant to work synergistically with glucosamine. Its not a matter of preference; they may well work better taken together, rather than separately. Unfortunately, "innovative, targeted & proprietary cetylated fatty acid esters & other active synergists" is a vague product description.

Try the Traumeel. It permanently cured chronic inflammation in my knee - a very long-standing injury. I've had clients use it on other chronic injuries (hamstrings, elbow/forearm tendonistis) with excellent results. It's extremely popular in Europe (from where it originates). I heard about quite a while ago, bought it for myself and an elderly neighbor (with arthritis), used it, forgot about it, then found my old tube to let a local client try it (with recurrent patellar/tendonitis), who found it to work quite well. I've since been recommending it on forums. Amazon carries it from a variety of retail sources, and its possible to find it there at a good price.

awesome, thanks for the heads up! I need that on my forearm tendonitis right now....I have a strong pulling sensation from back extensors to my brachs....I also think my radial head in outa place...I can barely do side lateral raises without a shooting pain running from my forearm to my wrist. I will also add glucosamine in with the celadrin...what do you think about cissus for both men and women?


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