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Different oils and their benefits


MEATHEAD99
(@meathead99)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

These are the diferent oils I have tried using to make gear. I usually use 50% grape seed or walnut oil and then mix it with 10% - 15% of the various different oils. They all work fine this way and I have never had any problems in numerous batches.

1. Jojoba - It's loaded with vitamins and minerals and leaves the skin silky soft. Excellent for psoriasis, eczema, acne, and hair care too. It penetrates the skin rapidly to nourish it; also softens and moisturizes mature and dry skin. Jojoba helps to heal inflamed skin conditions such as psoriasis or any form of dermatitis, helps control acne and oily scalps. Since it has antioxidant properties, it can keep other oils from going rancid. Cautions - It is frequently blended in a small dilution (10%) with other carriers. It has a very long shelf-life.

2. Black Seed Oil - Its shelf life is at least 18 months when kept in a cool place and away from direct light. contains thymoquinone and thus may be useful as a treatment for rheumatism and related inflammatory diseases. The oil is said to contain p-cymene and thymoquinone as well as oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid. The total average sterol content of this oil is 51% and includes 63% beta-sitosterol, 17% stigmasterol, an 15% campesterol.” It's not a very liquid oil and is also safe for internal use.

3. Emu oil - Anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, skin regenerative, high in oleic acid (oleic acid has better skin-penetrating qualities than vegetable oils), moisturizing, doesn’t clog pores, penetrates through several layers of skin. The bottle of Emu oil should be shaken ever so lightly to mix the contents prior to each use. is now being used at top hospital burn centers across the country as a crucial aid to healing burned skin tissue, aiding elasticity, lubrication and diminishing scarring. Great for arthritis pain and inflammation, too. Some of its uses are:

* Assists with the healing of bed sores.
* When applied to a new cut, scrape or burn, assists with prevention of scars.
* Provides sunburn relief.
* Massage on muscle aches and strains.
* Very helpful for arthritis pain and inflammation.
* Provides canker sore relief.
* Useful for diaper and heat rash.
* Massage on children who have "growing pains" in their extremities.
* Assists with prevention of stretch marks; once stretch marks are present, assists with eliminating accompanying dryness and itchiness. Makes tight skin more supple. Shelf-Life - 6 months to a 1 year. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening.

4. Foraha Oil - Slightly waxy oil is rich and thick. Foraha is a traditional medicine in the So. Pacific, where it is used for its analgesic, antiinflammatory and cicatrizant properties. Formerly, foraha was used to treat leprosy. It helps wounds to heal and is soothing for eczema and skin irritations such as burns, rashes and insect bites. It is used as an aid for relieving pain, healing wounds, herpes lesions and post-surgical scars. A combination of foraha and Ravensara aromatica essential oil has been used successfully as a treatment for shingles.

5. Avocado Oil - (10%-20% dilution) Skin problems, especially eczema and psoriasis, respond to its high content of vitamins A and E. This is a highly therapeutic oil which is rich in vitamins A, B1, B2, vitamins D and E, protein, pantothenic acid, and fatty acids. It is, in most cases mixed with another carrier, such as Almond, or Grapeseed to make up at around 10% of the total carrier mixture. Shelf-Life - refined 12 months to 18 months. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening. Crude - 6 months to 9 months

6. Borage oil - (10%-15% dilution rate) is clear and slightly thick with very little odor. It contains an abundance of gamma linoleic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid that the body uses to manufacture prostaglandins–hormone like substances that balance and regulate cellular activity. It reduces the aging process of the skin and reverses damage from ultraviolet rays. This oil is used to treat PMS, endometriosis, and menopausal discomforts, as well as for psoriasis and eczema. provide relief to people who suffer from chronic skin disorders such as eczema and atopic dermatitis. It is the richest known source (24%) of an essential fatty acid called gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Shelf-Life - 3 months to 6 months. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening.

7. Evening Primrose Oil - Extremely helpful in treating menstrual and pre-menstrual problems, eczema and psoriasis. It’s useful in treating allergic skin problems. It is exceptionally high in fatty acids, and especially in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) which nutrition wise is important to the body, as it affects many of the enzyme functions in the body. Its healing action results from its high content of gamma linolenic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid that is vital to cell and body functions and not produced by the body itself. It relieves sunburn and minor skin irritations, relieves dry, chapped skin, and builds strong fingernails. Cautions - The shelf life of Evening Primrose oil is not very long, it goes rancid quickly. To help it keep longer, blend in a small (often 10%) dilution with other carrier oils. Keep away from light and heat.

8. Grapeseed oil - High in vitamin E and is 76% essential fatty acid, linoleic acid (also known as Omega 6). It is low in saturated fat, contains natural chlorophyll and valuable antioxidants (known as proanthocyninidins), and has a good shelf life. Very rich in vitamins, minerals and linoleic acid. Shelf Life - 6 months to 1 year. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening.

9. Hemp seed oil - (Use no more than 10% in final mix to prevent spoiling) High linoleic and linolenic acid contents make it vulnerable to spoilage. Alpha linolenic, linoleic and oleic acids––the essential fatty acids known as the omegas––make up 88% of the total fatty-acid content. It contains more naturally occuring essential fatty acids than any other plant-derived oil and a perfect 3:1 Omega-6: Omega-3 EFA ratio. The oil also contains the natural anti-oxidant vitamin E and sterols which blocks cholesterol absorption. It is also a cell regenerator and helps soothe muscles. Its particularly moisturizing for dry, damaged skin and for eczema and psoriasis. This oil requires cool, dark, oxygen-free storage conditions. An unopened container can be stored in the deep freezer indefinitely and in the refrigerator for a year.

10. Aloe Vera Oil - It may also be used for internal or oral applications. The juice, extract and oil is said to encourage skin rejuvenation, healing of wounds and treatment of sunburn. It is also used to help in relieving arthritis pain, improving blood circulation, reducing scarring, and has anti-inflammatory properties. It is a superb penetrating moisturizing agent, helping to stimulate the body's immune system while being naturally hypoallergenic with about the same pH balance as the skin. Store at or slightly below room temperature, away from light. Cautions - There are no known side effects or cautions with aloe vera. Shelf-Life - 6 months to a 1 year. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening.

11. Rosehip Seed Oil - This oil reduces scarring, heals burns, and softens scars and keloids. It is high in GLA, and has recently been used to help reduce the signs of ageing, especially the fine lines around the eyes and lines around the mouth, the drying effects of the sun and climate, as well as assisting with attenuating both accidental and surgical scars, healing burns, and stretch marks. It can help diminish broken capillaries, but may also aggravate acne or blemished skin. The application of rosa mosqueta oil produced rapid healing of the inflammation, darkening and dermatitis caused by radiation. This is the best antiaging oil to use in skin care. However, it may turn rancid quickly and should be stored in a cool place or refrigerated. Cautions - It is usually blended in a small (often 10%) dilution with other carrier oils.

12. Walnut Oil - Very unsaturated, walnut oil presents good moisturizing, anti-aging, regenerative, emollient and toning properties. Walnuts contain a host of other important vitamins and minerals. Walnut oil is useful against fungal and parasitic infections. It may also help eliminate warts, and when rubbed on the skin, walnut is reputed to be beneficial for eczema, herpes, psoriasis, and skin parasites. The oil has traditionally been used externally in the treatment of gangrene, leprosy, and wounds. Cautions - Non-toxic, Non-irritant. This carrier can be used in any cosmetic product as an active principle or as a carrier, without any proportion limit. Considered to be safe in all normal applications. Shelf-Life - 6 months to a 1 year. If kept properly in airtight container, Should be refrigerated after opening.


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MEATHEAD99
(@meathead99)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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Topic starter  

Also if you want to make sure the oils do not go bad or rancid it is good to add Grapefruit seed extract and/or T-50 all natural vitamin E oil. Both of these will preserve the life of the carrier oils. I usually use about 2% Grapefruit seed extract. Products that contain as little as 0.1 percent GSE have an indefinite shelf life. In concentrations up to 1 or 2% of volume total, GSE is useful not only in preserving the product, but also in protecting the consumer from bacterial infection. Vitamin E contains Tocopherols which are nature’s perfect antioxidant. The optimal level of tocopherols in finished products will range from 0.01% to 0.2% of the oil content. Because antioxidants can only prevent oxidation, not reverse it, it is important to add the antioxidant as early in the process as possible. Tocopherols also slow the onset of rancidity oils.

You can go here to buy both of these along with almost any oil or essential oil you can think if: http://www.bestdeal.org/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=Essential&Category_Code=17

I always make my gear with both GSE and Vitamin E and have never had any extra pain or problems. But I always mix all of the oils together that I am using and then filter them with a Stericup Filter Unit .22 µm PVDF or Nalgene Filter Unit .20 µm PES into a Glass Media Bottle which I store in the freezer. Then when I am ready to add my favorite hormone I take it out of the freezer warm it up and follow the normal procedure to make whatever injectable I am making. Then at the end I filter the final solution again with a Stericup Filter Unit .22 µm PVDF or Nalgene Filter Unit .20 µm PES.

You can find the vacum filtration supplies here: http://researchlabsupply.com/Scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=28


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BacardiSlang
(@bacardislang)
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Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 211
 

Great info Meathead, thanks.


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MEATHEAD99
(@meathead99)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

I have used all of the different oils I mentioned and mixed them in different quantities and have never had any separation with any of them. I know some people say they have had a separation problem but none of these have given me a problem. Though if you added peg that could cause some separation but then you can run the vial under hot water and shake it before you draw the oil. So even if you did have some separation you can take care of it by making sure it is well mixed before you use it.


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buffdiggity
(@buffdiggity)
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Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 59
 

I dunno about that. Some of those don't strike me as being friendly to IM inject. I can think of a lot of benefits for using baby oil on my skin, but I sure as hell would not inject it into my body.


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BioHazard03
(@biohazard03)
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Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 156
 

I dunno about that. Some of those don't strike me as being friendly to IM inject. I can think of a lot of benefits for using baby oil on my skin, but I sure as hell would not inject it into my body.

i totally agree with this. i would be very scared to inject some of these oils. it just doesn't seem hygenic, nor safe.


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MEATHEAD99
(@meathead99)
Active Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

Well I do agree that some of them seem strange to inject. But after actually doing it using various different concentrations of each I can say that I didn’t see or feel anything strange and had no side effects.

One thing that I did do was use small amounts (around 10%) of some of the more exotic oils like jojoba, emu, foraha, hemp, etc.


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