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defying genetics


elicash74
(@elicash74)
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Will consistent training and dieting eventually overcome my genetics? I am predisposed to carrying fat on my thighs and lower legs all the way to my ankles. My grandmother and my mother have this problem. My question is will this stubborn fat eventually leave and is there any thing I should do differently to target this fat by way of diet or supplementation. My weight is 140lbs. Currently eating six meals a day (25 g carb 18 g protein and 8 g fat per meal). Height is 5 ' 2" so I'm guessing my lean body mass at around 90lbs. My goal is to maintain around 12 percent body fat and lean out my legs. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


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shpongled
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Posted by: @elicash74
Will consistent training and dieting eventually overcome my genetics?  I am predisposed to carrying fat on my thighs and lower legs all the way to my ankles.  My grandmother and my mother have this problem.  My question is will this stubborn fat eventually leave and is there any thing I should do differently to target this fat by way of diet or supplementation.  My weight is 140lbs.  Currently eating six meals a day (25 g carb 18 g protein and 8 g fat per meal).  Height is 5 ' 2" so I'm guessing my lean body mass at around 90lbs.  My goal is to maintain around 12 percent body fat and lean out my legs.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

The only way to really take care of this is lowering bodyfat %. Gaining muscle in the legs will also reduce the appearance of fat to some extent (while also increasing BMR). Squats may be especially effective.

As far as supplementation the only way to spot reduce is with a topical cream. I would try Lipoderm-Y. I have a feeling that Lipoderm Ultra, when it comes out will be even exponentially more effective. A topical anti-estrogen may also help, but I'm sure someone else could be of much more help in that area.

-David Tolson


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George
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i am not sure what you mean by overcoming genetics ....

can you be as lean as you want ? yes

can you be that way without dieting ? no

i generally agree with what shpongled says, but something has to be made clear: caloric deficit is the single most important thing here ( shpongled assumed this is obvious ).

never mind if you already know all this


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elicash74
(@elicash74)
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I think my post is clear as far as creating a caloric deficit. The question simply is whether or not something can be done to battle my genetically predisposed fat deposits (lower legs) to balance out my fat distribution. I don't want to have to get as lean as a contest condition bodybuilder in my upper body to have only moderately lean legs. I'm not saying this is where I'm at right now. It's just that the genetic predisposition is so strong that I'm afraid that's what is going to happen. Does this make more sense?

Thanks for the responses


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shpongled
(@shpongled)
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Lipoderm Y, and L-Ultra when it comes out, is definitely your best bet then.

Some think Lipoderm Y with powdered caffeine is very effective:

http://forum.avantlabs.com/index.php?act=S...rm,and,caffeine

Just get some Lipoderm-Y from 1Fast400.com, caffeine powder from www.kilosports.com ($30 per kg), and put some of the caffeine in (1.5-3 grams from looking at that thread). Should work quite well.

-David Tolson


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George
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I don't want to have to get as lean as a contest condition bodybuilder in my upper body to have only moderately lean legs.

ok i see what you're saying. but i dont think you should worry about that. if you currently estimate yourself at about 35% BF, then maybe wait till you get to about 15% BF before becoming paranoid. i think your bigger problem will be to put some size back on those legs ( in form of muscle ) once the fat is gone.


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Labrat
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My question is will this stubborn fat eventually leave and is there any thing I should do differently to target this fat by way of diet or supplementation.  My weight is 140lbs.  Currently eating six meals a day (25 g carb 18 g protein and 8 g fat per meal).  Height is 5 ' 2" so I'm guessing my lean body mass at around 90lbs.  My goal is to maintain around 12 percent body fat and lean out my legs.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Realize that one of the evolutional disadvantages in the above is that the lower body is the last area to see any significant losses in fat. It resists mobilization (I explained this once before here, or was it elsewhere?). Several research studies have suggested that cardio activity will enhance mobilization of fat from these stubborn deposits. Basically, high intensity cardio increases SNS and PNS activity in that area (which is resistant to this type of nervous system stimulation) and thus increases lipolysis (fat burning) AND carries those freed fats away from the area to muscles and other organs to use as fuel. Othewise, blood circulation is low(slow) and the freed fats are driven back into the cells and into body fat again (called re-esterified fatty acids).

A balanced exericse program consisting of resistance and cardio exercise, and calorie restriction, should over time reduce your body fat to your desired level. Your upper body fat will decrease (including your breasts, which is predominantly adipose tissue, so don't be surprised to see them become smaller), and when your total body fat is down in the teens, you will start to see your lower body fat decrease as well.

When I prepped for a bb competition, it was not until I had reached about 12% bodyfat before the fat on my glutes and thighs really started moving. When I got down to 8%, there was little bodyfat on my upper body and the only place for it to come off was lower body, with it decreasing on a daily basis until I reached 6% with exercise and diet only, no drugs except alternating ephedrine and yohimbe 5 days/week. (I was a guinea pig for the Human Performance Lab during this preparation and my bf was measured by caliper and water displacement methods throughout.) Not bad for a middle-aged old.....

So, yes it can be done.


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lylemcd
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Posted by: @Labrat
Men have the same issues with their abdominal body fat. And it kills them quicker, if that's any consolation.

Similar issues, not the same. Compared to hip/thigh fat, abdominal sub-cutaneous fat is far more mobilizable.

As well, it's visceral fat, not ab sub-q fat that kills men quick.

Lyle


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Labrat
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Posted by: @lylemcd
Men have the same issues with their abdominal body fat. And it kills them quicker, if that's any consolation.

Similar issues, not the same. Compared to hip/thigh fat, abdominal sub-cutaneous fat is far more mobilizable.

As well, it's visceral fat, not ab sub-q fat that kills men quick.

I didn't want to digress into the visceral vs. sub-q fat issues (thought about it and decided it was time to go to sleep instead). And this was a recent topic of discussion on the lowcarb/exercise list, which I didn't feel like reiterating here.

Howeever, I will mention that the ab visceral fat becomes an issue for post-menopausal women, too. And contributes to the increase in CVD risk/rates in this age and gender group.

Thanks for making that point.


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sherrie
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Several research studies have suggested that cardio activity will enhance mobilization of fat from these stubborn deposits. Basically, high intensity cardio increases SNS and PNS activity in that area (which is resistant to this type of nervous system stimulation) and thus increases lipolysis (fat burning) AND carries those freed fats away from the area to muscles and other organs to use as fuel.

Would this (high intensity cardio) also apply to women who carry fat in their upper body?


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Panzer
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While genetics play a huge role in how we'll look etc, they can be overcome to a great degree. Obviously, Pee Wee Herman will never be Arnold, even if he roided for 10 years straight. But, I say that using your limitations as motivation is key. I was skinny as a rail when I started lifting. I'm 5'11" and weighed between 120 & 130lb. Since then, I've gained 100lb on my frame and easily tripled my strength. I have a long way to go, but don't let apparent limitations overcome you. I was told by so many people (including my old doctor) that I'd never be 200lb or more...I was just skinny and would always be that way. It's funny seeing people now (100lb later) that knew me back then. Most don't even recognize me unless I say something first. Don't let what you percieve as momentarily impossible get into your head. Make up your mind, burn that goal into your subconscious and you'll meet your goal. Of course, this is within reason. I'll never be a superheavyweight gold medal weightlifter in the Olympics, but you get the idea. You can improve beyond your wildest dreams if you choose to do so. Good luck! You've come to the right place for learning just how to meet those goals you're setting!


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Leslie
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Good post Panzer. I must say from personal experience, since my mother has very thick, tree stump like legs, I was always dieting and exercising NOT to look like that. Its mean but true. I firmly belive weight training has aided in giving my leg"shape." The most important thing is DIET. I cannot stress this enough. If I were to gain weight long ago, I would have had the stump look. I had been lifting for a few years before hardcore dieting, and I will say it wasn't until my diet was clean that I noticed dramatic changes.

You cannot spot reduce, although Lipoderm is excellent. You need to stick to your diet and not give up. Eventually your body will shed the fat in the thighs. You may not ever have thighs/calves like you have in your mind, but surely you can make the most of what you have.

People tend to work out to attain a look of someone. This is impossible. When training/dieting you should be going for the look that is YOUR best.

Good Luck!


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George
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People tend to work out to attain a look of someone. This is impossible. When training/dieting you should be going for the look that is YOUR best. 

true. unfortunately you have no clue what you will look like once you're "there." you can use your imagination for motivation purposes but ultimately you will re-evaluate your goals once you see some significant changes.

when dieting down from a high bodyfat your face changes a lot, i doubt you can predict how it will look at 12% you will just have to find out


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Par Deus
(@par-deus)
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Posted by: @Labrat

Howeever, I will mention that the ab visceral fat becomes an issue for post-menopausal women, too. And contributes to the increase in CVD risk/rates in this age and gender group.

Thanks for making that point.

Same for the obese (I assume due to increased androgen levels from overeating -- insulin and friends' stimulation in luteal or theca cells or wherever it happens in PCOS)

par deus

Juggernaut, bitch!!


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