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Beta_Blockers?


Lewis
(@lewis)
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Joined: 3 months ago
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I ran into this guy at a conference this past weekend.He was shorter than me but just as big.He said he use to do alot of powerlifting,and he new some of the guys I new.He said he didn't train as heavy as he use to,that he does more reps and cardio.He mentioned that he takes Beta-Blockers,that one of his best friends is a doctor at the Cleveland Clinic and that all the doctors take it to keep there heart on a good arithma.He said it was very important for bodybuilders over 40yrs.Which Iam.My question,does anybody do this,and is this something we should think about doing.He said just go to your doctor for a script.Lewis?


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CYPHON
(@cyphon)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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Ive used lopressor. im not 40 but it's a great drug when doing serious heavy lifting. Keep the blood pressure from going sky high and doing arterial damage. Also helps prevent cardiac problems. Definitely a good drug for those over 40.


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bigkap
(@bigkap)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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I wouldn't take it unless I had high BP or a fast heart rate. It blocks epinephrine and some block nor-epinephrine therefore for obvious reasons it wouldn't be advantageouf for a bodybuilder. Esp if you are older, your max HR is lower, and therefore your HR will not get as high, and therefore may compromise how much blood your heart can pump. As a side note, betablockers do work well for test-anxiety, and certain precision events like sharpshooting, and archery.


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Katz
 Katz
(@katz)
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That's interesting they do not work well with precision events? I was never told that when I took them for migraine prevention. I don't remember noticing a performance compromise.


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QueenofDamned
(@queenofdamned)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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the only time i would consider utilizing beta blockers (since i don't have high bp) is a few days before competing.

beta blockers "stop" adrenaline from being released into the body. nervousness can cause water retention, beta blockers stop this from happening.

they also make you feel "groggy" so i wouldn't suggest using them unless absolutely nessicary.

QOD


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QueenofDamned
(@queenofdamned)
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Joined: 8 months ago
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the only time i would consider utilizing beta blockers (since i don't have high bp) is a few days before competing.

beta blockers "stop" adrenaline from being released into the body. nervousness can cause water retention, beta blockers stop this from happening.

they also make you feel "groggy" so i wouldn't suggest using them unless absolutely nessicary.

QOD


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QueenofDamned
(@queenofdamned)
Estimable Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 175
 

the only time i would consider utilizing beta blockers (since i don't have high bp) is a few days before competing.

beta blockers "stop" adrenaline from being released into the body. nervousness can cause water retention, beta blockers stop this from happening.

they also make you feel "groggy" so i wouldn't suggest using them unless absolutely nessicary.

QOD


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THUMPER
(@thumper)
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Joined: 1 month ago
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We are currently discussing beta-blockers in my pharmacology classes. I agree with QOD to not take them unless they are necessary. These drugs are designed to treat HTN and make the workload on the heart easier. Normally in these instances you would give something like furosemide, or HCTZ. Beta blockers are by no means an ACE inhibitor but they do produce the same effect by blocking your Beta-1 receptors. This inhibits your kidneys from secreting Renin. When this happens your RAAS can not take place. If you are going to take one I would look at one in the Metaprolol group as they are cardio selective, if you go with the Proprolol group they are not selective, they will block Beta 1 and Beta 2.

If you do decide to run these be very, very aware of hyperkalemia, especially if they are taken with something like spirolactin (sp). These will make your potassium levels sky rocket.

If you get nothing from this, at least understand that these drugs are to be used under precaution. I would not take them unless they are physician prescribed.

PS My spelling on these could be way off just to warn you.


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Lewis
(@lewis)
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Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

Thanks guys for the info.I will definetly look into this further before even remotely thinking of taking.Since I don't suffer from high blood pressure and when it comes to stress i think we all deal with that a litttle.Thanks for the info Queen,I have noticed a difference in my body a few times at a large show during pre-judging,nerves.than i go through my comp. and see where I stand for the night show.Than I can relax and load up for the night show. Thanks,Lewis.


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syntex
(@syntex)
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Joined: 1 month ago
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I WAS AT A BODY BUILDING SHOW THIS LAST WEEKEND AND TALK TO AN OLD PRO BODY BUILDER HE WAS TALKING ABOUT THIS SPIROLACTIN TO GET THAT REEL THIN SKIN AND GRAINIE LOOK HE SAID YOU TAKE IT THE LAST WEEK BEFORE THE SHOW W/ DYAZIDE IT WILL MAKE YOU DROGGY JUST TO STICK IT OUT BUT CAN'T FIND THE CORRECT SPELLING AND IT'S NOT SPIRO LACTONE A.K.A ALDACTIZIDE. ANY HELP!:yeah We are currently discussing beta-blockers in my pharmacology classes. I agree with QOD to not take them unless they are necessary. These drugs are designed to treat HTN and make the workload on the heart easier. Normally in these instances you would give something like furosemide, or HCTZ. Beta blockers are by no means an ACE inhibitor but they do produce the same effect by blocking your Beta-1 receptors. This inhibits your kidneys from secreting Renin. When this happens your RAAS can not take place. If you are going to take one I would look at one in the Metaprolol group as they are cardio selective, if you go with the Proprolol group they are not selective, they will block Beta 1 and Beta 2.

If you do decide to run these be very, very aware of hyperkalemia, especially if they are taken with something like spirolactin (sp). These will make your potassium levels sky rocket.

If you get nothing from this, at least understand that these drugs are to be used under precaution. I would not take them unless they are physician prescribed.

PS My spelling on these could be way off just to warn you.


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THUMPER
(@thumper)
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Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 6
 

I WAS AT A BODY BUILDING SHOW THIS LAST WEEKEND AND TALK TO AN OLD PRO BODY BUILDER HE WAS TALKING ABOUT THIS SPIROLACTIN TO GET THAT REEL THIN SKIN AND GRAINIE LOOK HE SAID YOU TAKE IT THE LAST WEEK BEFORE THE SHOW W/ DYAZIDE IT WILL MAKE YOU DROGGY JUST TO STICK IT OUT BUT CAN'T FIND THE CORRECT SPELLING AND IT'S NOT SPIRO LACTONE A.K.A ALDACTIZIDE. ANY HELP!:yeah
A. Hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril) — Most widely used
1. Mechanism of action—Blocks reabsorption of sodium and chloride in early segment of distal
convoluted tubule; ability to promote diuresis dependent on kidney function; does not work well
with renal damage
2. Pharmacokinetics—Diuresis 2 hours after oral with peak 4–6 hours, lasting 12 hours
3. Therapeutic uses—Primary hypertension, edema, and diabetes insipidus
4. Adverse effects—Identical to loop except these lack ototoxicity
5. Drug interactions—Similar to loop diuretics except can be combined with other ototoxic drugs
without hearing loss
6. Preparations, dosages, and administration—Tablets and oral solution, take early in day to decrease
nocturia
B. Other Thiazide-Type Diuretics—Twelve other agents used that are similar

VI. Potassium-Sparing Diuretics—modest increase in urine production and decrease in potassium excretion;
two subcategories (aldosterone and nonaldosterone antagonists)
A. Spironolactone (Aldactone) — Only one approved in U.S.
1. Mechanism of Action—Blocks actions of aldosterone in distal nephron to increase retention
of potassium and excretion of sodium but may take up to 48 hours to work
2. Therapeutic Uses—For hypertension and edema in combination with loop or thiazide most often
and for primary hyperaldosteronism; in 1999 researchers found that spironolactone can benefit patients
with heart failure
3. Adverse Effects—Hyperkalemia, endocrine effects of gynecomastia, menstrual irregularities, impotence, hirsutism and deepening voice
4. Drug Interactions—Thiazide and loop diuretics to counteract potassium loss; never give with drugs that increase potassium (ACE inhibitors)
5. Preparations, Dosages, and Administration—Tablets or with HCTZ

Hope this helps, it is just copy and pasted from my notes. I am lazy 🙂


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hdracing
(@hdracing)
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Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
 

Syntex....QUIT TYPING IN CAPS!!!!


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